Urban Gardening: Growing Tomatoes (Part 2)

For your reference, here is a list of entries under the Urban Gardening series:



I didn't realize that it's been almost three months since I gave an update on my tomatoes! Quite honestly, things aren't looking good for my container garden, ever since Typhoon Lando wreaked havoc on our balcony. I'm still hopeful that my plants would survive until 2016, but I'm not too optimistic about that.

But since I've got some gardening photos piling up, might as well blog about it.

Day 44: Final Re-potting

By this time, my tomatoes sprouted bigger leaves and have grown at least one dangkal in length. As the grower pots seem to be getting smaller for them, I decided that it was time to put them in their final container.

Healthy seedling, yay!

To enable more root growth for the big container, I had to snip off some of the bottom leaves, including the cotyledon.

Tomatoes grow roots on the stem planted underground.

A shorter plant on a bigger container.

IMPORTANT NOTE: It is always best to plant deep, because deeper roots means a larger root system, which results to sturdier plants with more ways to absorb nutrition from the soil.

Day 62: Flower Buds!

By this time, my tomato plants have grown considerably tall and were sprouting yellow flower buds on their top parts. It is during this time that I was able to confirm that my tomato plants are, in fact, of the determinate variety, which means that they won't be growing any more than that height (which is good because I don't think my balcony can handle tomato vines).

A photo posted by Miriam P. See (@ako_si_iam) on

Unlike indeterminate varieties, all the flowers of a determinate tomato plant form and bloom at the same time.

Little green buds...


...that bloom into lovely yellow flowers.

The flower blooms within the week of the budding, and will bloom until it gets pollinated. If no pollination occurs, the flowers will drop off the stems... kinda reminds me of a women's monthly cycle.

I have a feeling that my next entry won't be a happy one...

Now my tomato plants are in quite a sorry state, wilted and droopy, not one flower pollinated. I am close to giving up on the plants, because I'm not really sure how long they can fight for their lives. So I'm guessing that my Part 3 will be about lessons learned, and what I SHOULD do to raise a healthy tomato plant. I've still some flowers blooming, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed that at least one of those flowers would make it to fruition.

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